how the FUCK do you forget to pay someone?

@4 days ago
#fuck you pay me 
bklynboihood:

meandmybois:

#OUTINTHENIGHT #NJ4

Anyone got deets on this film?

bklynboihood:

meandmybois:

#OUTINTHENIGHT #NJ4

Anyone got deets on this film?

(Source: talesfromakennedy, via fuckyeahlgbtqblackpeople)

@1 week ago with 4243 notes

This is why i can’t stand meeting new people/dating:

text convo between someone that messaged me on okcupid:

"wyd"

2 hours later…

"hey wyd"

Later on that day…

"wyd"

What i finally say…

"laundry and working"

What they say…

"oh"

*blocks and deletes*

@2 weeks ago
#what even? #forreal tho? 
call black women ugly all day, every day, exclude them from beauty round-ups, write *scientific* articles on how theyre the ugliest women on earth:*crickets* and/or agreement
call white women ugly:omg how cruel! they have feelings! you dont know their life and what theyve been through! everyone is beautiful in their own way! beauty standards arent everything! if you have nothing nice to say, dont say anything at all!
@2 weeks ago with 2687 notes
so-treu:

it’s finally forreal forreal finished! my first ever zine! :D
Death Valley: Or, How to Not Kill Yourself in Less Than Ten Days is a reflection of what i learned and how i survived a particularly dark night of the soul. it’s an untangling of a suicidal ideation beyond tropes of “hormonal imbalance” or “lack of exercise”, into questions of race and Blackness and memory and displacement and belonging, and what all goes in to be a Black person in the world who chooses to live.
it’s suuuuuuuper personal and i am both scared and excited about the whole thing. just. aaaaaa. all the feels.
you can purchase it here at my paypal - $2 for the zine, plus $1 for shipping and handling.

so-treu:

it’s finally forreal forreal finished! my first ever zine! :D

Death Valley: Or, How to Not Kill Yourself in Less Than Ten Days is a reflection of what i learned and how i survived a particularly dark night of the soul. it’s an untangling of a suicidal ideation beyond tropes of “hormonal imbalance” or “lack of exercise”, into questions of race and Blackness and memory and displacement and belonging, and what all goes in to be a Black person in the world who chooses to live.

it’s suuuuuuuper personal and i am both scared and excited about the whole thing. just. aaaaaa. all the feels.

you can purchase it here at my paypal - $2 for the zine, plus $1 for shipping and handling.

@2 weeks ago with 563 notes

"Ya eyes are blue, but you ain’t white, your hair is straight ‘cause you pressed it last night"

School Daze - Spike Lee (1988)

(Source: activist-hat)

@3 weeks ago with 23 notes
Hairy, and ashy legs, don’t care

Hairy, and ashy legs, don’t care

@3 weeks ago with 1 note
#me 

This blog supports Black women being selfish as fuck with their time and energy.

eshusplayground:

This Tumblr fully supports, “I don’t feel like it” as a perfectly viable reason for a Black woman not to go out of her way to do a damn thing for somebody who ain’t doing shit for her.

(via glitterlion)

@3 weeks ago with 5598 notes

ethiopienne:

pay my student loans so i know it’s real (✿ ♥‿♥)

@4 days ago with 248 notes

gradientlair:

andyouwilldeal:

True friendship…

LMFAO! Good times…

@1 week ago with 548 notes

"

Combahee River Collective co-founder Barbara Smith’s introduction to Women’s Liberation came as a student on campus at Mount Holyoke College in 1968. Anti-war activist Mark Rudd was visiting the school and a woman traveling with him spoke about the Women’s Liberation movement. Smith, who had grown up during the hostile time of racial segregation was skeptical about the movement’s message and its target audience. “I could not figure out how that [Women’s Liberation movement] could be, given the fact that she was White,” Smith continued, “What did White women have to complain about?” From her standpoint, the relationship between Black and White had been fraught with tension throughout U.S. history. White women were considered the mistresses of the plantation , while Black women were relegated to slave labor. “It [ the movement’s message] was hard for me to grasp from my perspective, because White women were so privileged.”

After she graduated college in 1969, she saw that the playing field wasn’t even in regards to women and equal rights. “When I experienced some of the attitudes and issues that all women faced, I became interested in feminism.” Recently, some critics have heralded singer Beyoncé’s latest album as feminist statement. Smith says that she’s happy that now being called a Black feminist is often considered a compliment. In the 1970s, when she began to work in the Black feminist movement, Smith suffered backlash.
“We [Black feminists] were definitely marginalized. Anything that didn’t look like it wasn’t in support of the central politics of the male-defined Black Power movement was considered disloyal.”

In 1973, Barbara Smith’s twin sister, Beverly, was working on the staff at Ms. Magazine and had a chance encounter with one of its editors, Margaret Sloan. She was organizing the first eastern regional conference for the National Black Feminist Organization (NBFO) and invited both sisters to the event. The conference called for women of color to convene in New York City and discuss issues that were being ignored by the White-dominated Women’s Liberation movement. Barbara Smith met with other Boston delegates to establish a local NBFO chapter there. The idea sounded simple, but it fell apart. “It was really difficult for NBFO to sustain a national organization with chapters with inadequate funding and staff,” Smith tells EBONY.com. And she and other Boston activists realized that their political agenda was different from the NBFO. In 1974, Smith co-founded the Combahee River Collective with her sister, Beverly, Demita Frazier, and other feminist activists.

"We [CRC] had a multi-issue perspective. It was understood that being radical was to the far left of being progressive. Plus, a number of us had experience in leftist politics and that’s one of the things that characterized the Combahee River Collective," Smith declared. The group’s name came from the heroic actions of Harriet Tubman, who solely led a campaign that freed more than 750 slaves at South Carolina’s Combahee River in 1863. The CRC’s overall mission was clear from its beginning. "We felt very strongly that we had the right to stand up and articulate a politics that looked hard at the conditions of Black women," states CRC member, Demita Frazier.

"

@2 weeks ago with 15 notes

Black is Queer Is Black 

theastutefemme:

-rant alert-

I’ve said what I am about to say many, many times, and ima’ continue to say it for as long as this rage sets up shop beneath my breastbone.


I will NOT, I repeat, WILL NOT compromise my sexuality for the sake of joining the pro-Black movement. Both my homosexuality and my Blackness…

@2 weeks ago with 21 notes

rainamilen:

askaboutnikki:

malcolmsex:

Amy Winehouse

💔

Valerie

(Source: ratgod)

@3 weeks ago with 31138 notes

http://pantherophis-guttatus.tumblr.com/post/89914903165 

pantherophis-guttatus:

I had an entirely spiteful and witty response that would have torn this particular person apart, but I remembered that I do not direct hate. People see this as weakness, when really I write things out to get it off my chest, and let it alone. I only project love. I don’t drop to a lower place than…

 photo 51771876.jpg

(via pantherophis-guttatus-deactivat)

@3 weeks ago with 4 notes

I’m waiting out a drug test because i’m scared imma fail it.

@3 weeks ago
#fuck